• Claridge Hotel in Atlantic City Joins Radisson Brand

     
    POSTED October 28, 2016
     

Radisson, a world-renowned hotel brand, has partnered with The Claridge Hotel in Atlantic City. Now known as The Claridge—A Radisson Hotel, the hotel was built in 1930; the 24-story hotel was known as the Skyscraper by the Sea and is a landmark reminiscent of the Jazz Age.

“We are excited to welcome this iconic and historic hotel to our growing portfolio,” says Javier Rosenberg, chief operating officer, Americas, Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group. “This partnership provides The Claridge access to Radisson’s global reservations systems and marketing efforts and furthers the brand’s commitment to offering locations in key destinations that cater to both leisure and business guests.”

The Claridge recently opened a conference center and a rooftop bar called VUE. They plan to further develop their leisure and meetings business with their latest partnership and through a new marketing plan.

“This new partnership is an exceptional opportunity for The Claridge to grow from a successful independent boutique hotel to a property with global reach in a range of business and leisure markets,” says Cem Erenler, vice president, operations and business development.

Before their partnership, The Claridge was purchased by TJM Properties in 2012, which led to a $25 million renovation. The hotel boasts 500 guest rooms and suites, a restaurant, cocktail lounge, rooftop bar, theater, conference center and 100,000 square feet of meeting and event space.

After several months of renovations, the DoubleTree by Hilton Philadelphia-Valley Forge is now open as the Alloy – King of Prussia, a DoubleTree by Hilton.

 

Due to COVID-19, non-essential travel was, or has been, banned for months. Long anticipated trips and in-person gatherings were canceled and people have adjusted to the new normal: staying at home and meeting over Zoom. However, states have been slowly lifting restrictions, and non-essential travel will soon be happening across the country again. However, some may not be as comfortable with the thought of traveling as they were before the pandemic.  

 

Retreats and off-site meetings present wonderful opportunities for groups to collaborate, strategize and build relationships away from their normal office environments. With proper planning, these sessions can be highly effective and even pivotal in setting a new direction. However, off-sites may present some unforeseen challenges that can quickly deflate the energy in the room if not anticipated and addressed in advance.