• Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: PAMPI After 5 Meeting

     
    FROM THE Spring 2015 ISSUE
     

The Philadelphia Area Chapter of Meeting Professionals International (PAMPI) held its monthly meeting on January 21 at the Courtyard Philadelphia South at The Navy Yard. There were a little over 90 people in attendance at this networking event, which invited industry executives to greet, meet and eat while making new friends.

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Sunday recommended that all gatherings of more than 50 people be cancelled or postponed for the next eight weeks, in order to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. The recommendation covers events like parades, concerts, festivals, conferences, sporting events, weddings and more.

 

For its September 2019 meeting, the National Association for Catering and Events (NACE) Philadelphia Chapter—which serves industry professionals in the Greater Philadelphia, South Jersey and Delaware region—thought it would try something different. Instead of focusing on the visual presentation of food, organizers took away the sense of sight entirely, outfitting diners with a blindfold at dinner.