• Meet Beth Koenig, Pennsylvania's Wonder Woman

     
    FROM THE Fall 2017 ISSUE
     

    Beth Koenig takes dedication to a whole new level.

At 4 a.m., most people are lying peacefully in bed with at least a couple of hours left to snooze. At 4 a.m., Beth Koenig, president at Brass Tacks Events PHL, has already started her day and is up working and sending emails. She sleeps only about five hours a night, leaves for work at 6 a.m., comes home and then gets back to even more work. 

“I have an extra pack of toothpicks to hold my eyelids up most of the day, but it all works out in the long run,” she says. “The busier I am, and the more stressed I am, the better I do in business.”

Koenig spent 17 years in catering before leaving to take a breather in 2016. Turns out that break was short lived— she opened her wedding and event company just a few months after stepping away from her job.

“I took a sabbatical from catering because I worked all of the time,” she says. “Now, I’m kind of right back into it.”

As if running a less-than-one-year-old company wasn’t enough, Koenig also took on the position of director of events for the Schulson Collective restaurant group in February 2017 and is the presidentelect of ILEA, an organization she credits for helping grow her professional career.

With so many responsibilities and plates in the air, it’s clear that Koenig enjoys what she’s doing—you don’t spend 15-plus hours a day doing something you hate. She’s been in the industry since high school, having worked for her local country club, then later majored in hotel restaurant management at Penn State. It’s almost as though meeting and event planning is in her blood. If anything, it’s definitely a part of her personality. 

“I’m very type A and I like organization, so I thrive on planning events for people and keeping them organized,” she says. “Every day brings new challenges, and when you overcome those challenges, you feel good about yourself.” 

A lifelon New Yorker, Emily Schmalholz was a TV producer at VH1 before moving into the events industry and landing at Westchester’s The Capitol Theatre. As director of special events at the historic space and its bar, Garcia’s, she says creating events and working in television have lots in common. “The ultimate goal for both is to tell a great story and create memorable moments.” Schmalholz, a self-described “event therapist,” had more to say about her work.

What’s the biggest difference between producing for television and producing events?

 

With so many people searching for niche, unique vacations, it can be difficult to find the perfect spot. However, if it’s rich history, a variety of event spaces, and a plethora of outdoor recreation activities you’re looking for, look no further than Altoona, Pennsylvania.

 

From Baltimore to Boston to brainstorming, Ralph Weaver has never been one to say “no” to trying something new. After studying communications and marketing at Boston University, the Baltimore native made his way to New York City where he worked with a public relations agency, allowing him to dip his toes in the world of event planning.  

And he hasn’t looked back since.