• Monopoly's 80-Year Anniversary Holds True to its Roots

     
    POSTED March 24, 2015
     

Atlantic City’s Boardwalk and its streets were the inspiration for the board game Monopoly back in 1935. Today, the area remains a part of the game, even as new editions are released.  

Recently, Hasbro, Inc.—the game’s manufacturer—announced they were asking the public to vote on new cities for an updated Here and Now edition. Atlantic City did not make the cut.

But in January, Hasbro introduced the Monopoly 80th Anniversary Edition with vintage tokens, cards and money in its original look and feel. Most importantly, the game goes back to its roots with the use of Atlantic City streets and landmarks.

“Atlantic City and Monopoly go hand in hand,” says John Palmieri, executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, the operator of the Atlantic City Tourism District. “Fans of the city don’t need to worry that Monopoly will no longer reflect its origins. Even at the advanced age of 80, Monopoly is remembering and celebrating its Atlantic City beginnings.”

After 80 years, Atlantic City continues to influence the game of Monopoly 

If you’ve hosted meetings at the Javits Center or other venues in Manhattan, you know that there’s more than enough to do in the borough to easily keep attendees busy for days.

 

Pittsburgh may be known as The Steel City, but it has plenty of greenery, too, and opportunities for groups attending meetings here to get out in nature. The Pittsburgh CVB, which has the tagline “Only in Pittsburgh,” has proudly shared the news that the Great Allegany Passage was named a winner in the 2022 USA Today “10Best Readers’ Choice” travel award contest for “best recreational trail.” 

 

The Events Industry Council’s Certified Meeting Professional program, established in 1985, is recognized around the world as a badge of excellence in the events industry.