• Monopoly's 80-Year Anniversary Holds True to its Roots

     
    POSTED March 24, 2015
     

Atlantic City’s Boardwalk and its streets were the inspiration for the board game Monopoly back in 1935. Today, the area remains a part of the game, even as new editions are released.  

Recently, Hasbro, Inc.—the game’s manufacturer—announced they were asking the public to vote on new cities for an updated Here and Now edition. Atlantic City did not make the cut.

But in January, Hasbro introduced the Monopoly 80th Anniversary Edition with vintage tokens, cards and money in its original look and feel. Most importantly, the game goes back to its roots with the use of Atlantic City streets and landmarks.

“Atlantic City and Monopoly go hand in hand,” says John Palmieri, executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, the operator of the Atlantic City Tourism District. “Fans of the city don’t need to worry that Monopoly will no longer reflect its origins. Even at the advanced age of 80, Monopoly is remembering and celebrating its Atlantic City beginnings.”

After 80 years, Atlantic City continues to influence the game of Monopoly 

Daily life has been significantly altered by COVID-19, no matter the industry. Many are working from home, while children stay inside for online schooling. Meetings and events have been hit especially hard, since the essence of the industry is face-to-face interactions. While we continue to self-isolate, plenty of organizations have been offering webinars with insights on how to handle the pandemic—watching webinars is a great way to use that extra time you might have used for your commute to learn something useful.

 

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.

 

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.