• Monopoly's 80-Year Anniversary Holds True to its Roots

     
    POSTED March 24, 2015
     

Atlantic City’s Boardwalk and its streets were the inspiration for the board game Monopoly back in 1935. Today, the area remains a part of the game, even as new editions are released.  

Recently, Hasbro, Inc.—the game’s manufacturer—announced they were asking the public to vote on new cities for an updated Here and Now edition. Atlantic City did not make the cut.

But in January, Hasbro introduced the Monopoly 80th Anniversary Edition with vintage tokens, cards and money in its original look and feel. Most importantly, the game goes back to its roots with the use of Atlantic City streets and landmarks.

“Atlantic City and Monopoly go hand in hand,” says John Palmieri, executive director of the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, the operator of the Atlantic City Tourism District. “Fans of the city don’t need to worry that Monopoly will no longer reflect its origins. Even at the advanced age of 80, Monopoly is remembering and celebrating its Atlantic City beginnings.”

After 80 years, Atlantic City continues to influence the game of Monopoly 

October is the month of fall color viewing, pumpkin picking, and pizza. Yes, October is National Pizza Month, and if you’re looking to commemorate the occasion, head to New Jersey.

Others may disagree—let’s make that, others will certainly disagree—but last year Food & Wine Magazine named New Jersey the best pizza state in America, followed by Connecticut and New York in the No. 2 and No. 3 spots, respectively. Pennsylvania landed in seventh place and Massachusetts nabbed 10th place. 

 

Atlantic City

Last year was the highest grossing ever for the United States commercial gaming industry.* Meeting planners who hold gatherings at casinos may just feel like they’ve hit the jackpot, too. Casino-based events provide one-stop convenience—the amenities of convention centers and bountiful hotel rooms, plus activities, dining, and nightlife. 

 

Doreen Guerin grew up an Air Force brat, living in Texas, Louisiana, and later England and France. When she was 13, her parents moved to Queens and, Guerin says, “I’m a New Yorker through and through.” That’s apparent from her accent as well as her dedication to the Javits Center, where, as the senior vice president of sales and marketing, she oversees the booking and event-related operations for more than 170 events each year. 

M+E: What fueled your interest in working in the conventions industry?