• Take a Spin at Pole Position Raceway for 23 Cents

     
    POSTED November 17, 2016
     

In response to the recent gas tax increase, New Jersey’s Pole Position Raceway is offering a 23 cent race to all of the visitors to their Jersey City location on Wednesday, Nov. 23. The offer is only open to visitors that present a gas receipt as proof of a fill-up between Nov. 1 and Nov. 23.

The 80,000-square-foot facility has two quarter-mile tracks and karts that can go up to 45 MPH. They also offer V.I.P. spaces for private parties and corporate events as well as arcade games, flat screen TVs and authentic racing memorabilia.

The offer is only available at the Jersey City location and is limited to one per customer. It cannot be combined with an additional offer and guests must show proof of a minimum 10-gallon purchase.

“We understand the frustration of New Jersey motorists due to the recent gas tax increase,” says Karen Davis-Farage, president and co-owner of the Pole Position Raceway venues in the East. “On Wednesday, Nov. 23, we hope to ease those frustrations by providing races at our all-electric and emission-free kart racing facility. We look forward to offering a thrilling race experience and softening the blow that motorists are currently facing.”

Daily life has been significantly altered by COVID-19, no matter the industry. Many are working from home, while children stay inside for online schooling. Meetings and events have been hit especially hard, since the essence of the industry is face-to-face interactions. While we continue to self-isolate, plenty of organizations have been offering webinars with insights on how to handle the pandemic—watching webinars is a great way to use that extra time you might have used for your commute to learn something useful.

 

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.

 

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.