Last week, Visit Philadelphia released their annual report that confirmed what those in Philly already knew—travel and tourism make a huge economic impact on the city.

The report noted that, in 2014, the industry’s impact was $10.4 billion. Other numbers showed that 39.7 million people visited the city; the impact supported 92,000 full time jobs; and that $655 million in state and local taxes was generated through the industry—helping support local programs.  

Additionally, the report featured information on leisure activities. Of the 39.7 million visitors, 34.9 million were there for leisure purposes, and of the 3.1 million hotel room nights, 30.7 percent were leisure stays. Philadelphia’s Saturday hotel occupancy is second only to New York City among major northeast cities.

“Greater Philadelphia’s tourism industry is strong and getting stronger each year,” says Meryl Levitz, president and CEO, Visit Philadelphia. “The leisure segment has been particularly successful. It’s increased 90 percent since 1997, making it the fastest growing segment of all.”

Daily life has been significantly altered by COVID-19, no matter the industry. Many are working from home, while children stay inside for online schooling. Meetings and events have been hit especially hard, since the essence of the industry is face-to-face interactions. While we continue to self-isolate, plenty of organizations have been offering webinars with insights on how to handle the pandemic—watching webinars is a great way to use that extra time you might have used for your commute to learn something useful.

 

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.

 

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.