Last week, Visit Philadelphia released their annual report that confirmed what those in Philly already knew—travel and tourism make a huge economic impact on the city.

The report noted that, in 2014, the industry’s impact was $10.4 billion. Other numbers showed that 39.7 million people visited the city; the impact supported 92,000 full time jobs; and that $655 million in state and local taxes was generated through the industry—helping support local programs.  

Additionally, the report featured information on leisure activities. Of the 39.7 million visitors, 34.9 million were there for leisure purposes, and of the 3.1 million hotel room nights, 30.7 percent were leisure stays. Philadelphia’s Saturday hotel occupancy is second only to New York City among major northeast cities.

“Greater Philadelphia’s tourism industry is strong and getting stronger each year,” says Meryl Levitz, president and CEO, Visit Philadelphia. “The leisure segment has been particularly successful. It’s increased 90 percent since 1997, making it the fastest growing segment of all.”

To paraphrase a signature Frank Sinatra tune, “It’s time to make a brand new start of it in old New York.” NYC & Company, the official destination and marketing organization and convention and visitors bureau for the five boroughs, has launched a record-breaking $30 million global multimedia effort with the message “It’s Time for New York City.”  Unfolding in several phases, the campaign will include television, digital, outdoor media and partnerships.

 

After being shuttered for two years, while it underwent a multi-million-dollar renovation, The Langham, Boston, has reopened its doors, restored and reimagined. “Guests of The Langham will surely notice the extraordinary transformation that came with the great deal of time and care, tying it seamlessly back to its Boston banking heritage but with a fresh, luxurious touch,” says Michele Grosso, managing director of the iconic downtown Boston property, which has 312 guestrooms, over 13,000 square feet of function space and two dining venues.

 

On September 1, over 1,500 businesses across the country illuminated their buildings with red lights to draw attention to the devastation that the live events and performance art industries have faced as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.